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Intent - What do we want children to learn?

At Carlton Colville we believe that reading is the key that unlocks all learning. Therefore, our intention is to create academic learners who achieve mastery in decoding and understanding texts by the time they leave our school. We provide our pupils with numerous opportunities to apply their reading skills across all curriculum subjects and the wider school curriculum.

We understand the vital connection between learning to read for pleasure and academic success/mental well-being. Children who read, really do succeed! Because of this, throughout a child’s time at Carlton Colville Primary School, a team of adults and older children serve as role models to nurture every pupil’s reading career, to ensure they are reading for pleasure.

This ethos of reading for pleasure permeates the entire school curriculum at Carlton Colville Primary School. In particular, we intend to enhance the quality of childhood experience and expand the horizons of any children deemed to have a low cultural capital (whether due to a disadvantaged background or any other reason). We intend to provide all children with a wealth of rich texts and, in particular, texts that they may not have otherwise encountered during childhood.

Our intention is that (by the end of Key Stage 2) pupils at Carlton Colville Primary School will be able: to read fluently and with expression, varying the tone of the voice to suit purpose and audience; to infer and deduce, so that they understand when writers are using metaphor, shades of meaning, figurative language, or are simply leaving some things unsaid; to understand texts from diverse genres and authors and to read for information in order to access the secondary curriculum.

We intend for our past pupils to begin secondary education with a lifelong love of books and reading and with the confidence to visit the library at their new high schools and select a suitable book; to enter secondary education with a deep-seated curiosity in books – an ability to select books that they know they will enjoy, but, moreover, a desire to explore and seek out new text types, authors and genres. 
 

Implementation - How are we going to achieve our intent?

Overview
Carlton Colville Primary School’s reading curriculum is driven by key texts from the Reading Spine that launch or underpin each topic and drive the topic's theme*, e.g. George’s Secret Key to the Universe linked to Space…the Final Frontier? in Year 5. Therefore, the school’s curriculum model is itself based upon reading across the curriculum. In Years 3, 4, 5 and 6 every child has access to their own copy of most of the class texts each half term. Children are permitted to take these texts home and read as part of their weekly home-reading, resulting in increased reading stamina, and more time in class to use the class text to drive guided reading, topic and written work, where appropriate. The initial ‘driving text,’ is then supported with additional literature surrounding the same topic but introduces non – fiction, poetry and a range of other genres.

We know that children learn best when the curriculum is well-sequenced. Children are taught new core knowledge, skills, understanding and vocabulary to deepen their conceptual awareness. However, our pupils are also given multiple opportunities to build on prior knowledge. Children of all abilities develop their skills, knowledge and understanding against each reading learning objective.

*this is true in many cases, but some texts do not link to the topic: they have simply been chosen due to being a piece of high-quality literature that will improve the cultural capital of our children.

The Teaching of Reading – EYFS and Key Stage 1
In the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1, we teach reading through a rigorous systematic synthetic phonics programme - Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised and our reading provision is also fully informed by current research and The Reading Framework: Teaching the Foundations of Literacy (DFE January 2022).

Big Cat Little Wandle books are used as the decoding books for pupils progressing through the Little Wandle programme. These books are carefully matched to the ability of each pupil, containing only the graphemes that the pupil has previously secured. Following the Little Wandle programme, pupils receive three reading practice sessions a week, focusing on: decoding, prosody and comprehension respectively.

Pupils struggling to secure particular phoneme/grapheme correspondence (GPCs) are identified quickly and receive catch-up sessions, as outlined in the Little Wandle programme [please see Phonics Policy for more details about the teaching of phonics].

Throughout their time in EYFS and Key Stage 1, pupils also take home a reading for pleasure book from the library or classroom book corner in order to develop a love of reading for pleasure and to increase their cultural capital. This book is to be enjoyed with parents and carers, who read the book to the child, unless the child has completed the Little Wandle programme and is able to decode the book. Readers still working through the Little Wandle programme are not expected to decode the reading for pleasure book. In years 1 and 2, this reading for pleasure book is often a book from the Reading Robins and Reading Puffins collection respectively, where pupils earn rewards for listening to aspirational texts with their parents and carers throughout the year. To support our younger pupils to take ownership of their reading, children in Key Stage 1 have Magpie Books that can be used during free reading time or in adult-led reading and writing activities where appropriate. Pupils use these books to collect and build up interesting ideas to use in their writing.

The Teaching of Reading: Key Stage 2
At Key Stage 2, the teaching of reading happens in a combination of shared reading (usually whole-class) and guided reading (in small groups). All teaching and support staff have received “FFT Reciprocal Reading” training and utilise this throughout the school where appropriate to the needs of the children, as a small group approach (or an intervention) to develop independence and comprehension skills.
In addition to direct teaching, teachers read high quality texts to pupils throughout the year, also using this as an opportunity to hear pupils read aloud and develop their fluency and prosody. These texts are detailed on each year group’s class reader timetable, and on the whole-school Reading Spine. All pupils in years 3, 4, 5 and 6 participate in the Reading Owls, Reading Falcons, Reading Hawks and Reading Eagles scheme respectively, where children can earn rewards for reading a range of aspirational texts throughout the year. To support reading widely for pleasure, children in Key Stage 2 have Magpie Books that can be used during free reading time or in adult-led reading and writing activities where appropriate. Pupils use these books to collect and build up interesting ideas to use in their writing.

Reading for Pleasure
We know that reading is the key that unlocks all the learning and we understand the vital connection between learning to read for pleasure and academic success/mental well-being. Children who read, really do succeed! Because of this, throughout a child’s time at Carlton Colville Primary School, a team of adults and older children serve as role models to nurture every pupil’s reading career, to ensure they are reading for pleasure: the Reading Spine is the bedrock of our reading curriculum, detailing all of the quality authors and texts a pupil will meet during their time at our school. An ethos of reading for pleasure permeates the entire school curriculum at Carlton Colville Primary School and is led by our Reading for Pleasure Leader. The following provision is evident in our school:

  1. Daily class reader/storytime sessions
  2. Classroom reading challenge
  3. Classroom book corners
  4. Classroom book recommendations/book blessings
  5. Book of the Week (assembly)
  6. The Library
  7. Junior Librarians
  8. Library Loyalty Card
  9. Reading Birds scheme
  10. Opportunities to use Magpie Books
  11. Reading Gladiators
  12. Celebrating World Book Day
  13. Bounce for Books Fundraiser
  14. The Book Fair
  15. Enrichment Storytime
  16. Adults (and high school students) as reading role models
  17. Book Club
  18. Visitors (high school students and children’s authors)
  19.  Learning Together events and Storytime events with parents and carers
  20. Early Bird Reading parent and carer helpers
     

Impact - What will it look like when we have achieved our intent?

  • Pupils who read widely for pleasure, understanding why reading is so important.
  • Pupils achieving bronze, silver and gold in the Reading Birds Scheme.
  • Pupils who have successfully completed Reading Gladiators.
  • High numbers of pupil applications for the role of Junior Librarian.
  • Older pupil can offer reading support, advice and encouragement to younger pupils.
  • A culture of book blessings/recommendations in classrooms.

Assessment

Through the explicit teaching of the Reading knowledge and skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time. 

Pupil Voice

Pupil voice from 2022 Year 6 leavers:

“We have greatly enjoyed books and stories in our enrichment sessions – it is powerful hearing lots of different adults read to us and promote books.”

“I remember learning phonics which was the start of my reading journey. I couldn’t read without phonics…learning my ABCs as well – that was the start of it all.”

“Teachers reading to us is amazing. Sometimes we get to act out the character we are reading about. Other times we magpie or read along with our own copy of the text. I like the way different teachers put on voices for the characters.”

“Reading Gladiators and the Reading Birds challenges definitely lifted my reading off the ground. They made me read things I wouldn’t normally have picked and I loved them!”

“Yes – they make you read a wider range of books and get out of your comfort zone.”

“My all time favourite book was “Once” by Morris Gleitzmann. It moved me and one of us went out and bought all of the books in the trilogy. Everyone should read once at least once – haha!”

"Picture books can be a peaceful break from text, when you just want to think deeply about something and not worry about decoding text. They still move on your comprehension."

Reading in Action

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